Woo With Words is an international agency that provides messaging coaching and marketing services to those in the professional development and personal growth space.
Our vision is to be the #1 messaging and marketing 
company for educators and coaches worldwide.
And our mission is to increase the impact 
and income of everyone we work with.
Our ideal client is someone who requires assistance to make more sales and generate more revenue in their business, either because they lack the knowledge and expertise, or the time and energy to 
implement it.

Whether you don’t know what to say or how to say it (and have a messaging problem) or don’t know what specific strategies and tactics you should use to make sure as many people as possible hear your message (and have a marketing problem) we think it’s safe to say that we know a thing or two, and would be the right guys for the gig.

ABOUT
US
MESSAGING SERVICES
MARKETING SERVICES
MENTORSHIP PROGRAMS
WORK WITH 
US
Woo With Words is an international agency that provides messaging coaching and marketing services to those in the professional development and personal growth space.
Our vision is to be the #1 messaging and marketing 
company for educators and coaches worldwide.
And our mission is to increase the impact 
and income of everyone we work with.
Our ideal client is someone who requires assistance to make more sales and generate more revenue in their business, either because they lack the knowledge and expertise, or the time and energy to 
implement it.

Whether you don’t know what to say or how to say it (and have a messaging problem) or don’t know what specific strategies and tactics you should use to make sure as many people as possible hear your message (and have a marketing problem) we think it’s safe to say that we know a thing or two, and would be the right guys for the gig.

ABOUT
US
MESSAGING SERVICES
MARKETING SERVICES
MENTORSHIP PROGRAMS
WORK WITH 
US










Our owner/founder Ness is a 29-year-old award-winning Doctor of psycho- and neuro-linguistics, from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. Having studied the subject for 10+ years, Vanessa is an expert in the extraction and expression of language.

Following her academic career, Vanessa founded Woo, and since doing so, has scaled it to 6 figures (and many of her clients’ businesses to 7 and 8!).

She and the team have been trusted by some serious household names, from Natalie Ellis and Danielle Canty, the CEOs of BossBabe, to world-renowned authors, highly esteemed speakers, bloggers, YouTubers and Instagram influencers—even reality TV personalities.

What’s more, her work has been featured in some major publications like Marie Claire, Daily Mirror, Psychologies Magazine and Express. Woo has also been featured by some big brands including 
Coca Cola.

Ness is authoritative enough in her space to have been invited to speak on her specialism alongside other well-known industry experts like Gabrielle Bernstein, and always welcomes the opportunity 
to do so!

Ness spends most of her time consulting, coaching and leading the team, but when she’s not doing that, she’s writing her book or working on the big vision for the business.

Our owner/founder Ness is a 29-year-old award-winning Doctor of psycho- and neuro-linguistics, from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. Having studied the subject for 10+ years, Vanessa is an expert in the extraction and expression of language. Following her academic career, Vanessa founded Woo, and since doing so, has scaled it to 6 figures (and many of her clients’ businesses to 7 and 8!).
She and the team have been trusted by some serious household names, from Natalie Ellis and Danielle Canty, the CEOs of BossBabe, to world-renowned authors, highly esteemed speakers, bloggers, YouTubers and Instagram influencers—even reality TV personalities.

What’s more, her work has been featured in some major publications like Marie Claire, Daily Mirror, Psychologies Magazine and Express. Woo has also been featured by some big brands including 
Coca Cola.

Ness is authoritative enough in her space to have been invited to speak on her specialism alongside other well-known industry experts like Gabrielle Bernstein, and always welcomes the opportunity 
to do so!

Ness spends most of her time consulting, coaching and leading the team, but when she’s not doing that, she’s writing her book or working on the big vision for the business.










Ness
CEO
Chief Executive Officer
Bright Spark
INFP
4 w 3
(Individualist and Achiever)
Pisces sun, Virgo rising
Generator
Paige
CCO
Head of Creative
Bright Spark
INTP
4 w 5
(Individualist and Investigator)
Scorpio sun, Aquarius rising
Generator
Hayley
EA
Executive Assistant
Chatterbox
ENFJ
4 w 3
(Individualist and Achiever)
Aries sun, Libra Rising
Generator

Ness
CEO
Chief Executive Officer
Bright Spark
INFP
4 x 3
(Individualist and Achiever)
Pisces sun, Virgo rising
Generator
Paige
CCO
Chief Creative Officer
Bright Spark
INTP
4 x 5
(Individualist and Investigator)
Scorpio sun, Aquarius rising
Generator
Hayley
EA
Executive Officer
Chatterbox
ENFJ
3 w ?
(Individualist and Achiever)
Pisces sun, Virgo rising
?

(As told by Ness.)
It was the summer of 2012. Jack was working as a chef at a local restaurant and travelled to and from work on a pushbike. On this particular day, a sunny 31st July, he rode home on his lunch break to feed our cat. Just two streets away from his place of work, however, he was hit by a car. In the blink of an eye (or rather the screech of a tyre), both of our lives changed. 

Forever.

You see, Jack wasn’t wearing a helmet, and so when his head hit the pavement, it caused irreversible damage. He suffered a hematoma (a bleed on the brain) and something called a diffuse axonal injury, which is the diagnosis given when the connections in the brain (called axons) are damaged as the brain shakes back and forth against the skull. That type of brain damage is difficult to detect on CT or MRI scans but is among the most devastating, as we later found out. 

After an eye witness called in the accident to 999, a helicopter ambulance airlifted Jack to the hospital and he was rushed straight into intensive care. The injury put his brain under an extraordinary amount of pressure, and so the doctors decided to medically induce a coma to try and protect him as much as possible. High pressure caused by brain swelling can make matters worse as it can starve some areas of oxygen and further injure tissue as it pushes against the skull. By reducing the brain’s electrical activity and slowing down its metabolism, a medically induced coma can minimise inflammation and prevent further damage.
But the numbers were only increasing; the pressure wasn’t releasing. And so there the doctors concluded they needed to remove a portion of Jack’s skull to make space for his brain to swell. Now, I’ll spare you all the gory details, so as not to gross you out, but even after his craniectomy, Jack didn’t make much of a recovery. When the consultants took him out of the medically induced coma, he wouldn’t wake up, no matter how hard they tried. He was in a natural one.

I didn’t cope well in this scenario, as you can probably imagine. On the one hand, because having a loved one in a coma sucks. On the other, because back then, I was a type-A personality who didn’t know the meaning of the words faith, trust or surrender. Jack’s recovery was beyond my control and beyond medical control. It was out of our hands and in the hands of God, and all I could do was sit by his bedside every day—multiple times a day—during visiting hours and hope and pray that one day he’d wake.

To put things into perspective, he was a no. 3 on the Glasgow Coma Scale (which is one off being brain dead), but I thought he’d make it despite the odds. By some miracle, he did. Now, Jack today isn’t the Jack I knew and loved before the accident, of course. He remained in a rehabilitation centre for over a year but made only a partial recovery.

His frontal lobe damage resulted in issues with his speech and mobility, but it was his inability to talk, not walk, that disturbed and perturbed me the most. 
It hit hard that he was left with language impairments 
that prevented him from expressing himself. 
His problems affected his relationship with me, his family members and his friends. And I knew they would affect his ability to hold down a job. I couldn’t see him progressing in his role with 
self-expression problems.

It was the summer of 2012. Jack was working as a chef at a local restaurant and travelled to and from work on a pushbike. On this particular day, a sunny 31st July, he rode home on his lunch break to feed our cat. Just two streets away from his place of work, however, he was hit by a car. In the blink of an eye (or rather the screech of a tyre), both of our lives changed. 

Forever.

You see, Jack wasn’t wearing a helmet, and so when his head hit the pavement, it caused irreversible damage. He suffered a hematoma (a bleed on the brain) and something called a diffuse axonal injury, which is the diagnosis given when the connections in the brain (called axons) are damaged as the brain shakes back and forth against the skull. That type of brain damage is difficult to detect on CT or MRI scans but is among the most devastating, as we later found out. 

After an eye witness called in the accident to 999, a helicopter ambulance airlifted Jack to the hospital and he was rushed straight into intensive care. The injury put his brain under an extraordinary amount of pressure, and so the doctors decided to medically induce a coma to try and protect him as much as possible. High pressure caused by brain swelling can make matters worse as it can starve some areas of oxygen and further injure tissue as it pushes against the skull. By reducing the brain’s electrical activity and slowing down its metabolism, a medically induced coma can minimise inflammation and prevent further damage.
But the numbers were only increasing; the pressure wasn’t releasing. And so there the doctors concluded they needed to remove a portion of Jack’s skull to make space for his brain to swell. Now, I’ll spare you all the gory details, so as not to gross you out, but even after his craniectomy, Jack didn’t make much of a recovery. When the consultants took him out of the medically induced coma, he wouldn’t wake up, no matter how hard they tried. He was in a natural one.

I didn’t cope well in this scenario, as you can probably imagine. On the one hand, because having a loved one in a coma sucks. On the other, because back then, I was a type-A personality who didn’t know the meaning of the words faith, trust or surrender. Jack’s recovery was beyond my control and beyond medical control. It was out of our hands and in the hands of God, and all I could do was sit by his bedside every day—multiple times a day—during visiting hours and hope and pray that one day he’d wake.

To put things into perspective, he was a no. 3 on the Glasgow Coma Scale (which is one off being brain dead), but I thought he’d make it despite the odds. By some miracle, he did. Now, Jack today isn’t the Jack I knew and loved before the accident, of course. He remained in a rehabilitation centre for over a year but made only a partial recovery.

His frontal lobe damage resulted in issues with his speech and mobility, but it was his inability to talk, not walk, that disturbed and perturbed me the most. 
It hit hard that he was left with language impairments 
that prevented him from expressing himself. 
His problems affected his relationship with me, his family members and his friends. And I knew they would affect his ability to hold down a job. I couldn’t see him progressing in his role with self-expression problems.

"Not knowing what else to do, I threw myself in at the deep end, learning all there is to know about expressing oneself through language."







"Not knowing what 
else to do, I threw 
myself in at the deep 
end, learning all there 
is to know about 
expressing oneself 
through language."

I pursued a master’s and later a PhD in neurolinguistics and specialised in something called anomic aphasia, a type of speech difficulty that affects one’s retrieval of words from the mental lexicon. This of course bore similarity to my own problems.

Neither of us were communicating what we wanted to, but while Jack’s issues had come about by accident, mine came about on purpose. I remember how it felt when I first came to that realisation. It made me feel like my life was a car crash—that I should be as ashamed as the driver who knocked Jack off his bike. That I, like he, was at fault. I had the ability to talk, to express myself. Jack didn’t. Yet I wasn’t willing to. Nothing was stopping me. No one was stopping me. I was the cause of my own problems.

The accident propelled Ness to pursue a PhD in Neurolinguistics so she could make a contribution to knowledge about the connection between the brain and language. She then built this business, seeing that there was a gap in the market to write conversion copy for entrepreneurs that helps them makes a difference and go the distance, using the Neurolinguistic programming tools and techniques she studied alongside her PhD (she’s a qualified, certified, NLP Master Practitioner, too).
Fast forward to the present day, we use all sorts of foolproof formulas, but specialise in direct response copy that calls the reader to take action.
We’ve also branched out to provide many more services than copywriting - graphic design, branding, list building, audience growth, page design and development, email marketing/management, social media marketing/management, podcast marketing/management, content creation and repurposing and passive income generation, to name but a few.
I pursued a master’s and later a PhD in neurolinguistics and specialised in something called anomic aphasia, a type of speech difficulty that affects one’s retrieval of words from the mental lexicon. This of course bore similarity to my own problems.

Neither of us were communicating what we wanted to, but while Jack’s issues had come about by accident, mine came about on purpose. I remember how it felt when I first came to that realisation. It made me feel like my life was a car crash—that I should be as ashamed as the driver who knocked Jack off his bike. That I, like he, was at fault. I had the ability to talk, to express myself. Jack didn’t. Yet I wasn’t willing to. Nothing was stopping me. No one was stopping me. I was the cause of my own problems.

The accident propelled Ness to pursue a PhD in Neurolinguistics so she could make a contribution to knowledge about the connection between the brain and language. She then built this business, seeing that there was a gap in the market to write conversion copy for entrepreneurs that helps them makes a difference and go the distance, using the Neurolinguistic programming tools and techniques she studied alongside her PhD (she’s a qualified, certified, NLP Master Practitioner, too).
Fast forward to the present day, we use all sorts of foolproof formulas, but specialising in direct response copy that calls the reader to take action.
We’ve also branched out to provide many more services than copywriting - graphic design, branding, list building, audience growth, page design and development, email marketing/management, social media marketing/management, podcast marketing/management, content creation and repurposing and passive income generation, to name but a few.
Copyright 2021. Woo With Words.